Dorian could drop 2-4 inches of rain — 6 in some areas — later this week

Tuesday's 11 a.m. cone forecast shows Dorian moving along the East Coast this week. (WYDaily/Courtesy of National Hurricane Center)
Tuesday’s 11 a.m. cone forecast shows Dorian moving along the East Coast this week. (Southside Daily/Courtesy of National Hurricane Center)

As Hurricane Dorian inches toward Florida with high winds and rain, southern states along the East Coast are also bracing for the storm’s impacts.

By the time is reaches southeastern Virginia, meteorologists forecast Dorian to be a Category 1 hurricane, delivering 2-4 inches of rain in many areas and up to 6 inches in select spots, National Weather Service Wakefield meteorologist Cody Poche said.

Eastern Virginia will experience tropical storm conditions as early as Thursday night and into Friday morning. Tidal flooding from the storm surge could occur along the coast, with “moderate to major” flooding in the Chesapeake area, he added.

“We have the potential to see heavy rain during those times,” Poche said. 

The latest National Hurricane Center cone forecast for Dorian, released around 11 a.m. Tuesday, shows the center of the storm reaching southeastern Virginia after 8 a.m. Friday morning. 

“It’s going to be moving pretty quick as it passes by us,” Poche said.

After Dorian passes Virginia, it will move out to sea. The cone forecast shows Dorian’s probable path staying offshore along the East Coast, eventually hitting Nova Scotia and Newfoundland Saturday and Sunday.

The specific impacts of tidal flooding and height of the floods will be better-known as the storm gets closer, Poche said.

Poche said the need for any evacuations will be determined by area emergency managers. 

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam declared a state of emergency Monday as Dorian dumped rain and heavy winds on the Bahamas.

The declaration allows the state to mobilize extra resources, people and equipment. It also allows Virginia officials to coordinate planning and evacuation resources with North Carolina.

As far as other impacts, Poche said the likelihood of Dorian spinning off tornadoes in eastern Virginia is currently low.

“We’re not expecting many, if any, tornadoes with this one,” Poche said Tuesday.

NASA astronaut Christina Koch snapped this image of Hurricane Dorian as the International Space Station during a flyover on Monday, Sept. 2, 2019. The station orbits more than 200 miles above the Earth. (Southside Daily/ Courtesy of NASA)
NASA astronaut Christina Koch snapped this image of Hurricane Dorian as the International Space Station during a flyover on Monday, Sept. 2, 2019. The station orbits more than 200 miles above the Earth. (Southside Daily/ Courtesy of NASA)

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John Mangalonzo (john@localvoicemedia.com) is the managing editor of Local Voice Media’s Virginia papers – WYDaily (Williamsburg), Southside Daily (Virginia Beach) and HNNDaily (Hampton-Newport News). Before coming to Local Voice, John was the senior content editor of The Bellingham Herald, a McClatchy newspaper in Washington state. Previously, he served as city editor/content strategist for USA Today Network newsrooms in St. George and Cedar City, Utah. John started his professional journalism career shortly after graduating from Lyceum of The Philippines University in 1990. As a rookie reporter for a national newspaper in Manila that year, John was assigned to cover four of the most dangerous cities in Metro Manila. Later that year, John was transferred to cover the Philippine National Police and Armed Forces of the Philippines. He spent the latter part of 1990 to early 1992 embedded with troopers in the southern Philippines as they fought with communist rebels and Muslim extremists. His U.S. journalism career includes reporting and editing stints for newspapers and other media outlets in New York City, California, Texas, Iowa, Utah, Colorado and Washington state.