Hampton Roads coalition aims to educate public about flooding

(Southside Daily photo/Courtesy of Courtney Engh)
(Southside Daily photo/Courtesy of Courtney Engh)

Hampton Roads has seen its fair share of flooding in recent years. Now one group is trying to help residents understand the risks associated with flooding and to get flood insurance.

“The damage of just one inch of water in your home can cost more than $25,000 in repairs,” said Ben McFarlane, a senior regional planner with the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission. “You could hope you’re never impacted by flooding, or you can protect yourself from devastating loss by signing up for flood insurance.”

The Hampton Roads Planning District Commission, along with other local government entities, has created a website, GetFloodFluent.org, with facts about flooding and common misconceptions, according to a news release.

“This is not just about whether you live on or near the water or even if your neighborhood has already experienced flooding or not,” McFarlane said. “This is about the fact that if you live in Hampton Roads, you are at risk of flooding.”

For more information, visit the Get Flood Fluent website.

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John Mangalonzo (john@localvoicemedia.com) is the managing editor of Local Voice Media’s Virginia papers – WYDaily (Williamsburg), Southside Daily (Virginia Beach) and HNNDaily (Hampton-Newport News). Before coming to Local Voice, John was the senior content editor of The Bellingham Herald, a McClatchy newspaper in Washington state. Previously, he served as city editor/content strategist for USA Today Network newsrooms in St. George and Cedar City, Utah. John started his professional journalism career shortly after graduating from Lyceum of The Philippines University in 1990. As a rookie reporter for a national newspaper in Manila that year, John was assigned to cover four of the most dangerous cities in Metro Manila. Later that year, John was transferred to cover the Philippine National Police and Armed Forces of the Philippines. He spent the latter part of 1990 to early 1992 embedded with troopers in the southern Philippines as they fought with communist rebels and Muslim extremists. His U.S. journalism career includes reporting and editing stints for newspapers and other media outlets in New York City, California, Texas, Iowa, Utah, Colorado and Washington state.