One dead in shooting Friday at NAS Oceana

VIRGINIA BEACH — A sailor is dead and another in the hospital following a shooting inside Naval Air Station Oceana Friday Morning.

David Todd, a spokesman for the Navy’s mid-Atlantic region, said it was an isolated, domestic incident. The base was immediately placed under lockdown shortly after the shooting at 6:45 a.m.

Base officials said one victim, a woman, also a sailor, was taken to the hospital. Information on her condition was not made immediately available, but officials called her injuries “non-life-threatening.”

The shooter, a man, was shot and killed by NAS Security officers.

In a news conference, Capt. Chad Vincelette, spokesman for NAS Oceana, said the shooting happened outside Hangar 145, the location of Strike Force Fighter Squadron 37.

The male sailor shot the woman with a handgun, Vincelette said, adding part of the investigation is to find out how the shooter was able to bring a weapon inside the base — NAS Oceana has a no weapons policy.

He did not identify both sailors. Vincelette said the base went back to normal operations an hour later.

Officials did not provide further details, including the relationship between the shooter and the woman.

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John Mangalonzo (john@localvoicemedia.com) is the managing editor of Local Voice Media’s Virginia papers – WYDaily (Williamsburg), Southside Daily (Virginia Beach) and HNNDaily (Hampton-Newport News). Before coming to Local Voice, John was the senior content editor of The Bellingham Herald, a McClatchy newspaper in Washington state. Previously, he served as city editor/content strategist for USA Today Network newsrooms in St. George and Cedar City, Utah. John started his professional journalism career shortly after graduating from Lyceum of The Philippines University in 1990. As a rookie reporter for a national newspaper in Manila that year, John was assigned to cover four of the most dangerous cities in Metro Manila. Later that year, John was transferred to cover the Philippine National Police and Armed Forces of the Philippines. He spent the latter part of 1990 to early 1992 embedded with troopers in the southern Philippines as they fought with communist rebels and Muslim extremists. His U.S. journalism career includes reporting and editing stints for newspapers and other media outlets in New York City, California, Texas, Iowa, Utah, Colorado and Washington state.