USS George H.W. Bush maintenance includes 3D printing upgrade

Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) arrived at Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY), Feb. 21, 2019 for a 28-month dry-docking planned incremental availability (DPIA). (U.S. Navy photo/William S. Hensley)
Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) arrived at Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY), Feb. 21, 2019 for a 28-month dry-docking planned incremental availability (DPIA). (U.S. Navy photo/William S. Hensley)

One of the nation’s aircraft carriers will spend the next two years in dry dock for some maintenance and state-of-the-art upgrades.

The USS George H.W. Bush arrived at Norfolk Naval Shipyard on Thursday. It’ll spend the next 28 months at the public shipyard.

During that period the carrier will upgraded with 3D printing technology. It will also get exoskeleton suits and training models using virtual reality.

The Bush became part of the U.S. Navy’s fleet in 2009. The 100,000-ton (101,605-metric ton) ship is the last of the previous generation of aircraft carriers in the Nimitz class. The newest generation is the Ford class, which already includes the USS Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier.

The Bush had returned from a deployment in August 2017.

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John Mangalonzo (john@localvoicemedia.com) is the managing editor of Local Voice Media’s Virginia papers – WYDaily (Williamsburg), Southside Daily (Virginia Beach) and HNNDaily (Hampton-Newport News). Before coming to Local Voice, John was the senior content editor of The Bellingham Herald, a McClatchy newspaper in Washington state. Previously, he served as city editor/content strategist for USA Today Network newsrooms in St. George and Cedar City, Utah. John started his professional journalism career shortly after graduating from Lyceum of The Philippines University in 1990. As a rookie reporter for a national newspaper in Manila that year, John was assigned to cover four of the most dangerous cities in Metro Manila. Later that year, John was transferred to cover the Philippine National Police and Armed Forces of the Philippines. He spent the latter part of 1990 to early 1992 embedded with troopers in the southern Philippines as they fought with communist rebels and Muslim extremists. His U.S. journalism career includes reporting and editing stints for newspapers and other media outlets in New York City, California, Texas, Iowa, Utah, Colorado and Washington state.