The Boy Scouts are now offering girls-only troops. Here’s what the Girl Scouts have to say about that

The Boy Scouts of America began adding girls-only troops this month to their newly formed Scouts BSA program, which serves youth from sixth grade to age 18.

Bill Deany, scout executive with the Tidewater Council of BSA, said there are currently 30 girls actively signed up in Scouts BSA in the Tidewater Region.

Those girls are placed in all girl troops, participating in the same programs the boy scouts do, he said.

When it comes time for events, the boy troops and girl troops will combine, Deany said.

While the new program has only just recently started, BSA’s cub scout program has been allowing girls to participate for the past year with around 300 girls from kindergarten through fifth grade participating, Deany said.

“We sell it as a family program,” he said.

Scouts BSA and the Cub Scout program are designed to allow the whole family to participate.

The Girl Scouts

There already exists an all-girl organization providing the same opportunities for girls, however.

Girl Scouts of America has been around for 106 years, and is hailed as a premiere leadership program led by girls for girls, said Courtney Herrick, public relations manager for Girls Scouts of the Colonial Coast.

Here is their released statement:

“Girl Scouts of the Colonial Coast (GSCCC) remains steadfast in the knowledge that Girl Scouts is the world’s single best leadership development program for girls. We are dedicated to serving girls in an all-girl environment through a girl-led program. Our mission is to serve girls, and girls only, and to foster their amazing leadership potential. Girl Scouts combines time-tested, research-backed program delivery methods with fun, innovative programming that speaks to the interests of today’s girls and their particular learning styles and leadership development. We’re moving forward with our innovative programming and with Girl Scout Cookie season, and we’re eager to continue serving the girls of our council and reaching out to more girls who want to become Girl Scouts!”

Girl Scouts of the Colonial Coast have access to adventure programs, stem programs, and much more. (Southside Daily Photo/courtesy of Girl Scouts of the Colonial Coast)
Girl Scouts of the Colonial Coast have access to adventure programs, stem programs, and much more. (Southside Daily Photo/courtesy of Girl Scouts of the Colonial Coast)

Herrick said there are more than 11,000 girls already participating in Girl Scouts under the Girls Scouts of the Colonial Coast chapter.

They have 5,000 adult volunteers and around 800 troops actively serving girls in this area, she said.

“We know what is best for girls,” Herrick said.

She said girls are heard in the Girl Scout organization and if there is something they want to do, the Girl Scouts will do their best to give them the opportunity.

“We meet our girls where they are,” she said, adding Girl Scouts will continue to develop and update their programs to meet the needs of their girls.

Marcy Germanotta, communications and marketing director, for the Girl Scouts of the Colonial Coast, said the organization has not lost any members since the Boy Scouts started accepting girls, and is currently in litigation the Boy Scouts regarding the trademarked name, Girl Scouts. And their mission statement hasn’t changed.

“Our mission is to serve girls, and girls only, and to foster their amazing leadership potential,” Germanotta said.

The Girl Scouts of America Colonial Coast chapter declined to comment on the pending litigation and referred questions to the nationwide organization’s leadership.

To learn more about the programs offered by the Girl Scouts of America and the Girl Scouts of the Colonial Coast chapter, check out this Girl Scout Fact Sheet or visit their website.

WYDaily reporter Julia Marsigliano contributed to this story.

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