Jamestown archaeologists fill in church site, plan exhibits for 2019 commemoration

The archaeological dig site inside the Jamestown Memorial Church has been filled in with stone dust to preserve the site underneath while allowing Jamestown Rediscovery to prepare for a 2019 commemoration exhibit inside the church. (WYDaily/Sarah Fearing)
The archaeological dig site inside the Jamestown Memorial Church has been filled in with stone dust to preserve the site underneath while allowing Jamestown Rediscovery to prepare for a 2019 commemoration exhibit inside the church. (Southside Daily/Sarah Fearing)

In just a few months, those who step into the Memorial Church at Jamestown will take a trip back in time.

Four-hundred years, to be exact.

Archaeologists are working to recreate the setup of the church where the House of Burgesses met in 1619 as the first representative government in the New World — one of several pivotal events recognized for the 400-year anniversary of several pivotal events in American history.

The project in the Memorial Church has been chugging along for several months on Jamestown Island.

Now, more special exhibits are being planned for several hundred feet away, inside the glass-sided Archaearium museum. They’ll cover martial law at Jamestown, items found in cellars at different points in history, Jamestown’s transition from a fort to a port and more.

The theme: Change over time in Jamestown.

“We wanted to tell more of the story,” said Michael Lavin, director of collections/conservation at Jamestown.

All together, the commemoration exhibits and projects have cost “a few hundred thousand dollars,” Lavin said, thanks to some grant money from James City County and another state grant.

The exhibits are slated to be complete in mid-April.

2019

The events recognized in 2019 also include the arrival of the first recorded Africans in North America, such as Angela, and the large-scale arrival of English women to the colony.

Many 2019 commemoration events are headed by American Evolution 2019, a state nonprofit connected with the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation and dedicated to the 2019 commemoration.

The Memorial Church project and new exhibits at the Archaearium are headed separately by the archaeologists at Jamestown Rediscovery, a nonprofit part of Preservation Virginia. The archaeologists have planned their exhibits based on the items and stories they’ve found through their archaeological digs.

“Archaeology is education,” said archaeologist Dave Givens. “What are we doing if not educating the hearts and minds of the American public?”

The church and cemetery

Jamestown Rediscovery has partnered with Stemann Pease Architecture to make the inside of the Memorial Church into a representation of the first Jamestown church — built in 1617 — where the House of Burgesses first met.

The site inside the church where archaeologists believe they found the remains of Virginia governor Sir George Yeardley was filled in with a special stone dust around the end of October to make way for the new setup.

A glass window in the Memorial Church floor will show the foundation of the second version of the church, built in the 1640s on the same site, Givens said.

The setup will include wood and brick flooring, handmade wooden pews, an altar, altar rail, the church’s chancel and choir — just as archaeologists believed the church to have looked.

The benches were made by the Ford’s Colony Woodworkers Club. Work began on the pews last fall after Givens and Lavin went on a trip to England to gauge how 17th-century churches should look.

Jonathan Appell from Atlas Preservation is working to restore the cemetery outside the Memorial Church at Jamestown. The graves were pieced back together in the early 1900s, but some pieces were not matched properly. (WYDaily/Sarah Fearing)
Jonathan Appell from Atlas Preservation is working to restore the cemetery outside the Memorial Church at Jamestown. The graves were pieced back together in the early 1900s, but some pieces were not matched properly. (Southside Daily/Sarah Fearing)

Givens said the church is also working to restore the cemetery outside the Memorial Church. The cemetery, which had been robbed and vandalized over time, was haphazardly put back together using Portland cement in the early 1900s.

Jonathan Appell from Atlas Preservation is working on putting the graves back together and identifying and matching various pieces.

The exhibits

Within view of the Memorial Church, the Archaearium museum hopes to complete the 2019 Commemoration package with new exhibits.

The Archaearium is built over the location of the Jamestown Statehouse, where the General Assembly met until the capital of Virginia moved to Williamsburg in 1698, said Jamie May, director of the Voorhees Archaearium Museum.

Many of the new exhibits aim to illuminate a comparison between different points in time at Jamestown.

“We wanted to tell more of the story,” Lavin said, adding that the museum featured many stories from the early years of Jamestown, but not as many showing

Many of the new exhibits aim to illuminate a comparison between different points in time at Jamestown. Pictured here, a case containing cellar items will be updated to become a part of the new "From Fort to Port" exhibit. (WYDaily/Sarah Fearing)
Many of the new exhibits aim to illuminate a comparison between different points in time at Jamestown. Pictured here, a case containing cellar items will be updated to become a part of the new “From Fort to Port” exhibit. (Southside Daily/Sarah Fearing)

One new exhibit will include items found by archaeologists that show foodways from various points in history at Jamestown. As Lord De La Warr implemented martial law around 1610, wares for food grew larger and more utilitarian.

Another exhibit will take up the last part of the Archaearium museum before the gift shop. It will be titled “From Fort to Port” and feature archaeological evidence on how the site transitioned from a English colony to an English town site.

Full-size realistic models of Jamestown’s buildings will also show how building methods changed over time. Many earlier buildings were mud-and-stud starting in 1607 when colonists arrived in the New World, but progressed to timber frame around 1611.

“They were thinking more permanently, even in 1610,” May said.

Update: Jamestown Rediscovery announced Wednesday the Jamestowne Society contributed more than $150,000 to Historic Jamestown for ongoing archaeology in and around the 1907 Memorial Church. Members of the Jamestowne Society trace their lineage back to Jamestown’s earliest settlers and leaders.

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John Mangalonzo (john@localvoicemedia.com) is the managing editor of Local Voice Media’s Virginia papers – WYDaily (Williamsburg), Southside Daily (Virginia Beach) and HNNDaily (Hampton-Newport News). Before coming to Local Voice, John was the senior content editor of The Bellingham Herald, a McClatchy newspaper in Washington state. Previously, he served as city editor/content strategist for USA Today Network newsrooms in St. George and Cedar City, Utah. John started his professional journalism career shortly after graduating from Lyceum of The Philippines University in 1990. As a rookie reporter for a national newspaper in Manila that year, John was assigned to cover four of the most dangerous cities in Metro Manila. Later that year, John was transferred to cover the Philippine National Police and Armed Forces of the Philippines. He spent the latter part of 1990 to early 1992 embedded with troopers in the southern Philippines as they fought with communist rebels and Muslim extremists. His U.S. journalism career includes reporting and editing stints for newspapers and other media outlets in New York City, California, Texas, Iowa, Utah, Colorado and Washington state.