Home from Syria: Norfolk sailors reunite with families in Norfolk

The attack against the targeted capabilities was designed to stop Syrian President Bashar al-Assad from using chemical weapons.

This April 19, 2018 photo shows the USS Monterey as it fires a 5-inch gun during a live-fire exercise in the Mediterranean Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Trey Fowler)
This April 19, 2018 photo shows the USS Monterey as it fires a 5-inch gun during a live-fire exercise in the Mediterranean Sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Trey Fowler)

NORFOLK — The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a 7-month deployment.

The Monterey, along with the USS Laboon and USS Higgins played a critical role in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations during the April 13 Tomahawk land attack missiles strikes on Syria. The three ships launched a total of 60 TLAMs to significantly impact the Syrian regime’s ability to develop, deploy and use chemical weapons in the future, according to the Navy.

“My Sailors rigorously trained during deployment workups and continuously during deployment to be ready for all assigned missions, and it paid dividends during this total team win,” said Cmdr. Victor Garza.

President Donald J. Trump announced that the combined forces of the United States, France, and the United Kingdom launched precision strikes against Syria’s chemical weapons capabilities shortly after the strikes. The attack against the targeted capabilities was designed to stop Syrian President Bashar al-Assad from using chemical weapons, according to the Navy.

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