Missing teen may be in Norfolk with ex-boyfriend, NC police say

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Law-enforcement officials in North Carolina are looking for a missing 17-year-old girl, Mackenzie Gail Rogers, who may be in Norfolk with her ex-boyfriend, Christopher Branter, 25. (Courtesy BCSO)
Law-enforcement officials in North Carolina are looking for a missing 17-year-old girl, Mackenzie Gail Rogers, who may be in Norfolk with her ex-boyfriend, Christopher Branter, 25. (Courtesy BCSO)

Officials in North Carolina are asking for help finding a missing teenage girl who may be in the Norfolk area with her ex-boyfriend, police say.

Mackenzie Gail Rogers, 17, was last seen at approximately 11 p.m. Friday at a home on Buckwood Court in Leland, N.C., according to a release from the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office.

She is five-feet five inches tall, has brown hair and brown eyes and weighs 140 pounds. She was wearing a black hoodie, black t-shirt, Carolina blue basketball shorts and black Vans.

Officials do not know how or where she is traveling, but she is believed to be in Norfolk with her former boyfriend, Christopher Brantner, 25.

Anyone with information should call Det. Ashley Stout at 910-880-4902.

This story has been revised to reflect that Rogers was last seen at roughly 11 p.m. Friday, not Saturday.

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Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Her recent book, Just Another Southern Town: Mary Church Terrell and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Nation’s Capital, was shortlisted for the 2017 Mark Lynton History Prize. Her first book, The Day the Earth Caved In: An American Mining Tragedy, won the 2005 J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award.