Where We Live: Norfolk historic bed and breakfast stellar location for a staycation

  • The Page House was built in 1899 and became and bed and breakfast in 1991 in Norfolk.

    The Page House was built in 1899 and became and bed and breakfast in 1991. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Rocking chairs sit on the Page House Inn's front porch in Norfolk.

    Rocking chairs sit on the Page House Inn's front porch. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Pre-Civil War furniture featured in the Page House Inn's third floor in Norfolk

    Pre-Civil War furniture featured in the Page House Inn's third floor. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • A photo of Herman Page in the Page House Inn's foyer in Norfolk.

    A photo of Herman Page in the home's foyer. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • The Page House Inn's informal parlor in Norfolk.

    The Page House Inn's informal parlor. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • A jelly dish that belonged to the Page family in the dining room in Norfolk.

    A jelly dish that belonged to the Page family in the dining room. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • This Italian cappuccino and espresso machine that dates back to the 1920s is still used today in Norfolk.

    This Italian cappuccino and espresso machine that dates back to the 1920s is still used today. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • The dining room features an eclectic mix of antique furniture in Norfolk

    The dining room features an eclectic mix of antique furniture. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Furniture on the Page House Inn's second floor. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • The bedroom in the Bathe Suite was converted from Herman Page's original study.

    The bedroom in the Bathe Suite was converted from Herman Page's original study. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • The Bathe Suite bathroom features this bathtub, a shower and a bidet.

    The Bathe Suite bathroom features this bathtub, a shower and a bidet. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • A pink colored bed and pineapple lamps in the Missy Hulda Room in the Page House Inn in Norfolk.

    A pink colored bed and pineapple lamps in the Missy Hulda Room. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • This claw-foot tub can be found in the Missy Hulda Room at the Page House Inn in Norfolk

    This claw-foot tub can be found in the Missy Hulda Room. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • One of 8 gas fireplaces at the Page House Inn is inside Miss Diane's Suite in Norfolk.

    One of 8 gas fireplaces at the Page House Inn is inside Miss Diane's Suite. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Inside the Miss Diane suite's bedroom in Norfolk.

    Inside the Miss Diane suite's bedroom. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • An original 19th century staircase in the Page House Inn's third floor in Norfolk

    An original 19th century staircase in the Page House Inn's third floor. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • A view of downtown Norfolk from the garden terrace at the Page House Inn.

    A view of downtown Norfolk from the home's garden terrace. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • The bed in Master Lawrie's room at the Page House Inn in Norfolk.

    The bed in Master Lawrie's room. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Some of the Page Family children are seen here in this photograph in the home's formal parlor in Norfolk.

    Some of the Page Family children are seen here in this photograph in the home's formal parlor. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • A plaque on display near the Page House Inn's front door in Norfolk

    A plaque on display near the Page House Inn's front door. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

Southsidedaily.com is your source for free local news and information in Virginia Beach

NORFOLK — Southsiders craving a weekend getaway don’t have to look far to enjoy the local coffee shops, bars, eateries and museums downtown Norfolk has to offer. But sometimes rediscovering a familiar city means sleeping on another bed.

The Page House Inn in Historic Ghent is about a two-minute walk from the Chrysler Museum of Art, blocks away from the Harrison Opera House and within a mile of the Attucks Theater, Chrysler Hall, the Norva and more.

The bed and breakfast is an attraction in itself, giving guests a look into the prominent Page family’s history with pictures on its walls, some of the family’s original pieces of furniture and bedrooms named after their members.

“Herman Page came here from Wales as a teenager,” Debra Wilborn, innkeeper at the Page House Inn said. “He represented 21 companies here in Norfolk, so he helped sell this area and build this area. He was a land speculator, he was into railroads, he was into raising cattle. If it made money, he was into it.”

Built in 1899, this red brick, seven-bedroom, ten-bathroom home on Fairfax Avenue features some of the original structure’s wainscoting, wood flooring and transoms.

“The Page family… they did contribute a lot to Norfolk,” Wilborn said. “This is like a mini museum.”

After a major renovation and many business owners over the years, Wilborn calls the Page House home and manages the historic home. She said the first time she walked in the home over a decade ago, she fell in love.

“She’s majestic,” Wilborn said of the home. “I like old things, and my condo at the time was very contemporary… I like that antiques don’t have to match, they can be eclectic.”

Wilborn said she stays in contact with living members of the Page family, recently entertaining his niece, who is in her eighties, at the home.

“I lover her, she is a spitfire,” Wilborn said. “We sat at the table and exchanged pictures and letters and everything about the family.”

The furniture throughout the home ranges from pre-Civil War era chairs on the third floor and subtle, consistent touches of pineapples throughout the rooms because Wilborn says its a fruit that makes people feel welcome.

The theme is so subtle, looking for pineapples while staying at the Inn could be a scavenger hunt. Tucked away in the home’s kitchen is a large steel Italian cappuccino and espresso machine from the 1920s that still works today, something its guests don’t normally see.

The little touches of eclectic themes the home features could keep someones eyes and thoughts busy sitting on one of the green couches in the informal parlor room or lying in the Master Perry bedroom on the second floor.

Interested in booking a room? You could live where the Page family did a century ago for the weekend. Booking is done through the inn’s website or by calling 757-625-5033.

Where We Live is a  feature looking at the homes and unique places to stay. Do you have a Southside home — on or off the market — that our readers may be interested in seeing? Let me know at justin@southsidedaily.com.