Where We Live: Virginia’s second-oldest dated tree has roots under Church Point Manor

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    Church Point Manor's farmhouse. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    The Commonwealth's second oldest dated tree exists at Church Point Manor. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    The staircase in the farmhouse features a "coffin corner" style. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    The farmhouse's original kitchen. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    The home features several European and American antiques. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    A living area in the farmhouse's Monsieur Et Madame suite. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    A bedroom in the Monsieur Et Madame suite. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    A bathroom in the Monsieur Et Madame suite in the farmhouse. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    A hallway in the farmhouse featuring a monkey mural. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    A foyer in Church Point Manor, the closest room to the old oak tree. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    A chandelier hanging in the parlor tie in with the home's subtle monkey furnishings and murals. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    A restroom underneath the stairs in the farmhouse. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    The Mon Petit Chou bedroom in the farmhouse. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    The carriage house at Church Point Manor. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    A living room in the carriage house. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    The Hibernia bedroom in the carriage house. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    An antiquated bathroom sink in the Blue Toile bedroom. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    The "Blue Toile" bedroom in the carriage house. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    A tennis court next to the pool at Church Point Manor. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • A saltwater pool at Church Point Manor. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    The entrance to the home's cellar, which was once used as a hospital for Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach

    Church Point Manor's dock on the Lynnhaven River. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

  • Church Point Manor in Virginia Beach on the Lynnhaven River

    A dock on the Lynnhaven River is about a five minute walk from the farmhouse. (Justin Belichis/Southside Daily)

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VIRGINIA BEACH — Before Church Point became a Bayside neighborhood, it existed as farmland local legend Adam Thoroughgood gifted to Old Donation Church in the 17th century. The church grew crops on the land for more than three centuries, but farmers handled the paperwork inside Church Point Manor.

“It got the name after the church that was on the point where the Lesner Bridge is now,” manager Lorenzo Suarez said. “This was a big center location for a lot of transactions, a lot of the farming and ledger books were kept here.”

Church Point Manor is a quaint campus of dwellings including a converted carriage three-bedroom house and a restored 1860s farmhouse that features a cellar restaurant, nine bedrooms and seven bathrooms — all above the roots of one of the Commonwealth’s oldest dated trees.

“That’s the second-oldest dated tree in the state of Virginia,” Suarez said pointing at a large oak tree next to the home.

The tree seems to be the manor’s central point, in between its gardens, saltwater pool, tennis court, farmhouse, carriage house, and a trail that leads to a dock on the Lynnhaven River, where oysters and blue crab are collected by staff often, according to Suarez.

Suarez said the farmhouse is the second-oldest house built in Virginia Beach — the Adam Thoroughgood House being the oldest.

It features original light-colored wood floors with unique cuts to fit its floors and its living areas, kitchen, bedrooms and restrooms are decorated with European and American antiques. There’s also a subtle touch of monkeys in most of the rooms aesthetic.

The furniture in the farmhouse reflects a time before power tools, from hand-stitched ornate rugs with uneven threads and a kitchen table created by fitting wood together. Old ledgers and books previous property managers have filled can be found atop furniture throughout the home.

Suarez said the farmhouse played a major role in the Civil War, too.

“The basement was used temporarily as a hospital for confederate soldiers, so a lot of men did lose their lives down there,” Suarez said.

Next to the farmhouse is a converted carriage house with large original barn-style doors, where a horse-drawn carriage was probably stored at some point. The three bedrooms in this dwelling feature floral themes.

Church Point Manor existed as a bed and breakfast when developer Jahn Summs purchased the property in 1993, but Suarez said it operates as a place to host events, like weddings, retirement parties or business retreats.

“We pride ourselves in smaller styles, around 50 people, although we accommodate up to 200 people max capacity,” Suarez said. “For this area in Hampton Roads, there’s nothing like it, unless you go to Williamsburg.”

Church Point Manor is available to rent for private events.

Where We Live is a  feature looking at the homes and unique places to stay. Do you have a Southside home — on or off the market — that our readers may be interested in seeing? Let me know at justin@southsidedaily.com.