Virginia Beach parks department aims for bullseye

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Virginia Beach Department of Parks and Recreation hosts an archery demo day Saturday from 1-3 p.m. at Bayside Rec Center. No experience necessary.
Virginia Beach Parks & Recreation will host an archery demo day Saturday from 1-3 p.m. at Bayside Rec Center. No experience necessary.

The Neptune Festival isn’t the only way to have fun in Virginia Beach this weekend.

There’s also archery.

Fresh on the heels of the Rio Summer Olympics, where men and women archers competed for gold,  Virginia Beach Parks & Recreation is getting in on the act. Archery Demo Day, slated to run Saturday from 1-3 p.m. at Bayside Rec Center, 4500 First Court Rd., is a free, no-experience-necessary chance to learn how to hit the bullseye.

“Ever wonder if you could shoot a bow and arrow and actually hit the target?” the department said in a release. “Come out and give it a try!”

Participants must be at least six years old. Anyone under the age of 16 must bring a parent or guardian.

But no need to bring a bow and arrow. The rec center will have equipment on hand, along with teachers.

“[O]ur skilled instructors will show you exactly what do to,” the release said.

 

 

 

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Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Her recent book, Just Another Southern Town: Mary Church Terrell and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Nation’s Capital, was shortlisted for the 2017 Mark Lynton History Prize. Her first book, The Day the Earth Caved In: An American Mining Tragedy, won the 2005 J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award.