Neptune Festival doubles down on old-school fun

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(King Neptune statue at the Oceanfront in Virginia Beach, VA, photo by Judah Taylor)
King Neptune statue at the Oceanfront in Virginia Beach. The annual Neptune Festival Boardwalk Weekend kicks off Friday.  (Photo by Judah Taylor/Southside Daily)

Neptune is all about tradition.

The Virginia Beach Neptune Festival gets underway Friday, and the formula is pretty well set. The boardwalk weekend, held every year at the end of September, brings throngs to the Oceanfront for activities ranging from a sandsculpting competition and a regatta to a parade and fireworks.

This year, organizers won’t be hailing a lot of new features, according to Becky Bump, a spokesperson for the festival.

One debut element will be on Saturday and Sunday, when attendees can check out a display about the Virginia Beach Police Department, Bump said. The exhibit will feature the department’s mobile command center, equine officers and the bomb squad. There will be also be a special sand sculpture on display, according to Bump.

Which technically falls in the category of tradition.

“But we’re real excited about that,” Bump said.

 

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Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Her recent book, Just Another Southern Town: Mary Church Terrell and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Nation’s Capital, was shortlisted for the 2017 Mark Lynton History Prize. Her first book, The Day the Earth Caved In: An American Mining Tragedy, won the 2005 J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award.