Virginia Beach looking for poll workers for Election Day

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(Photo Courtesy Virginia Beach Voter Registrar)
(Photo Courtesy Virginia Beach Voter Registrar)

Whatever happens on Nov. 8, Election Day will be historic and Virginia Beach wants to give qualified residents a front row seat.

Virginia Beach Voter Registration & Elections is looking for workers to help at polling places, according to a release. Duties include voter check-in, paperwork and tallying of results. Poll workers must attend training in November. For the training and Election Day combined, they are paid $160.

Still, the job may not be for everyone.

To be eligible, poll workers must satisfy a number of additional criteria. Among the requirements: they must be registered voters in Virginia, must be able to speak, read and write English and must be patient “when interacting with a variety of people during a long day,” the release said. Poll workers cannot be elected officials or employees of an elected official. They cannot engage in political conversations with voters and election officials while working at the polls. And they must be “willing to do what is necessary” to maintain a secure voting environment.

If interested, call 757-385-8683 or submit an online interest form.

The deadline is Oct. 14.

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Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Her recent book, Just Another Southern Town: Mary Church Terrell and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Nation’s Capital, was shortlisted for the 2017 Mark Lynton History Prize. Her first book, The Day the Earth Caved In: An American Mining Tragedy, won the 2005 J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award.