Virginia Beach police kick off neighborhood survey

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(Photo courtesy Virginia Beach Police Department)
(Photo courtesy Virginia Beach Police Department)

Police officers went door to door in Virginia Beach Wednesday night, hoping to strengthen community ties and reduce crime.

The push, part of an annual neighborhood survey, will bring teams of uniformed officers from the Virginia Beach Police Department to all four precincts by the end of September. Last night’s canvass was in the First Precinct, with a roster of almost 1,800 addresses, Public Affairs Officer Tonya Pierce said in a phone interview. The target is to interview 1,500 to 2,000 residents in all four precincts, according to a release.

“Basically, it’s just to strengthen the working relationship,” Pierce said. “It’s much easier to have an open dialogue that way.”

Officers who take the survey also distribute pamphlets about crime prevention and other information to help boost residents’ involvement in the community, according to a release.

Next up are the Second Precinct on Sept. 14, the Third Precinct on Sept. 21 and the Fourth Precinct on Sept. 28.

The surveys are slated to begin at 5:30 p.m. and end by 9:00 p.m., a release said.

 

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Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Her recent book, Just Another Southern Town: Mary Church Terrell and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Nation’s Capital, was shortlisted for the 2017 Mark Lynton History Prize. Her first book, The Day the Earth Caved In: An American Mining Tragedy, won the 2005 J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award.