City man pleads guilty to assaulting officer in Naval Exchange lot

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A Virginia Beach man pleaded guilty Wednesday to assaulting a federal officer with his car at Naval Air Station Oceana in May.

Marcus D. Wilkins, 27, was indicted by a federal grand jury on June 8, stemming from an incident in the parking lot of the Navy Exchange, according to a release from Dana J. Boente, the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia.

On May 1, Marcus took a shopping cart full of merchandise from the exchange without paying, the release said. The items included two Bose headphones, a PlayStation cordless controller, four scented candles, a North Face backpack, and three games for PlayStation 4: Call of Duty, NBA 2K16 and Madden NFL, according to the indictment.

A loss-prevention officer directed Marcus to stop, the release said. Instead, he walked toward his car, leaving the cart behind. A base police officer positioned himself in front of Marcus’s car and ordered him, twice, to stop. Marcus drove into the officer, sending him airborne, and fled. The Virginia Beach Police Department apprehended Marcus shortly after he left the parking lot.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Douglas E. Miller accepted the plea. Marcus faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison, according to the release.

Image courtesy Google Maps.
Image courtesy Google Maps.

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Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Her recent book, Just Another Southern Town: Mary Church Terrell and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Nation’s Capital, was shortlisted for the 2017 Mark Lynton History Prize. Her first book, The Day the Earth Caved In: An American Mining Tragedy, won the 2005 J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award.