Parks department rounding third for public input on youth sports

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(Courtesy VB Parks & Recreation)
(Courtesy VB Parks & Recreation)

Think you’re the parent of a future Olympian?

If so, or if you have more modest ambitions for your child, time is running out to talk to Virginia Beach Parks & Recreation about your athlete. This week, the parks department is wrapping up a series of town-hall meetings about its recreational sports program for children. The open forums, the last in a series of eight such sessions, are designed to let residents weigh in about a range of topics, including: sports programs they’d like to see; the level of competition they prefer within the program; and the goals they have for children who participate.

The town-hall forums come on the heels of a recent Youth Sports Survey, undertaken earlier this year, to canvass local residents about the future of the program.

Tonight’s community meeting will be at Meyera E. Oberndorf Central Library, located at 4100 Virginia Beach Blvd., from 6-8 p.m.

The final meeting will be Aug. 10 at Bayside Recreation Center, located at 4500 First Court Rd., at 6:30 p.m.

The City offers sports leagues for children and teenagers from the ages of 10 to 18, according to its website. The current offerings are football, basketball, volleyball and softball.

 

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Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Joan Quigley is a former Miami Herald business reporter, a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and an attorney. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, TIME.com, nationalgeographic.com and Talking Points Memo. Her recent book, Just Another Southern Town: Mary Church Terrell and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Nation’s Capital, was shortlisted for the 2017 Mark Lynton History Prize. Her first book, The Day the Earth Caved In: An American Mining Tragedy, won the 2005 J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award.