City investing in public safety position again after eight years

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(Courtesy of vbgov.com)

(Courtesy of vbgov.com)

Virginia Beach will soon reinstate a deputy city manager of public safety, almost a decade after the position went away.

The City is currently looking to fill the opening with a public safety expert, who would earn between $126,446 and $194,132 annually, depending on experience. The deputy city manager of public safety was last filled by Charlie Meyer; the job was eliminated when he left in 2007. Since then, the city manager has taken on the public safety duties, along with the city manager’s other responsibilities, which include supporting City Council and overseeing planning, economic development and other City departments. In May, City Council approved reinstating the separate deputy position.

“One city manager in charge of all that wasn’t a good arrangement,” Marc Davis, media and communications manager for the City, said in a phone interview.

The reinstatement was reflected in the city’s budget for fiscal year 2016.

“The change will place more focus on public safety issues and allow the City Manager to work directly with City Council on executing the overall goals and mission of the city,” the budget said.

Once hired, the public safety official will oversee the police and fire departments, emergency medical services, emergency communication and citizen services, homeland security and others. Candidates must have a master’s degree in fire science, criminal justice, public administration, business administration or a similar program and eight years of high-level management experience. The city will consider applicants with a combination of higher-level education and experience equivalent to 14 years in public safety, including eight years as a municipal executive. 

An initial review of applications will be done by Aug. 28, but the posting will remain open until it is filled, according to a City announcement.

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City investing in public safety position again after eight years